Rhyming Patterns

Learn about rhyming patterns

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Using rhyming patterns in poetry can take your child’s writing to the next level! Writing in many different styles, including poetry, can help expand your child’s writing skills. As your child begins to experiment with poetry, they’ll naturally start to explore different rhyming patterns. Rhyming patterns help bring poetry to life, making them feel more rhythmical and magical. Let’s talk about the beauty of rhyming patterns!

What are rhyming patterns?

Rhyming is when two words sound alike at the end like “dog” and “hog”, or “love” and “dove”. Rhyming patterns in poetry involve using rhyming words at the end of poetry lines to follow a pattern of rhyming words throughout the poem.

Why are rhyming patterns important?

As mentioned earlier, rhyming patterns help bring poetry to life! They make poetry more special. Not all poetry will use rhyming patterns, but they are a great way to get started with rhyming practice. Poetry with rhyming patterns can be read like a song or tune by your reader, which brings a different meaning to them. Rhyming patterns help to depict certain meanings or emotions as well, which is another purpose they may serve. All in all, rhyming patterns in poetry can be very impactful in your poetry, which is why it’s an important skill to learn!

Rhyming Pattern Examples

Here are some basic rhyming pattern examples for your child to get started with using rhyming patterns in their poetry!

ABAB Rhyming Pattern

In rhyming pattern names, we use letters to denote the words at the end of a line rhyming. So in the ABAB rhyming pattern, the first and third lines will have words at the end that rhyme with each other. The second and fourth lines will also have words at the end of them that rhyme with each other. Here is a simple example of an ABAB rhyming pattern:

I like to run. (A)

My friends like to play. (B)

The beach is very fun. (A)

I hope you have a great day! (B)

AABB Rhyming Pattern

In this case, the first two lines will have words at the end that rhyme with each other, while the second two lines will have words that rhyme with each other at the end of each line.

Here is an example of an AABB rhyming pattern:

My family loves our cat. (A)

She loves to wear her hat. (A)

Sometimes she gets stuck in trees. (B)

And she’s so afraid of bees! (B)

ABCB Rhyming Pattern

In this rhyming pattern, the first and third lines will not rhyme with any of the other lines. But, the second and fourth lined will have words that end each line that rhyme with each other. Here is an example of an ABCB rhyming pattern:

My best friend’s name is Jack. (A)

He really likes to go in his pool. (B)

His favorite food is pizza. (C)

I think he’s really cool. (B)

Activity & Resource

Now that we’ve provided enough background information and some examples of rhyming patterns, your child can try out this activity that will help them practice. Good luck and happy rhyming!

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